Thursday, July 7, 2016

Eastern European Family History Conference

I received the following press release about the Eastern European Family History Conference to be held August 8-12, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah. I thought it would be of interest to those of you with Eastern European ancestry. 



-- For Immediate Release --
Springville, Utah
Eastern European Family History Conference
Perhaps the best-kept secret in Salt Lake City is a small, personalized conference on how to do research on Eastern European ancestors. Hosted annually by the Foundation for East European Family History Studies (FEEFHS), the conference is a bit more like a workshop – with intentionally small class sizes to allow sufficient attention to individual questions and needs.  The 2016 conference will be held 8 -12 August 2016 at the Plaza Hotel in Salt Lake City.
This year’s program is country-research-rich, with a full 3-day track on German research, and extended Polish, Russian, and Austro-Hungarian research tracks.  Class instruction levels include getting started research in a specific east European country (assuming a foundational knowledge of genealogical research), as well as more in-depth topics and unique record sources for advanced researchers.  Optional consultations are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
The 2016 program opens with a welcome reception on Tuesday evening and ends with a banquet on Friday evening, with research time available on other evenings and Saturday at the nearby Family History Library. Two pre-conference workshops will be offered: “Finding the Village of Origin,” which helps participants determine the name of the village their ancestor was born in/came from; and “Learning Cyrillic,” which prepares participants to read records written in Cyrillic Script.

Full information may be found at feefhsworkshop.org, with organizational information at FEEFHS.org


Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Is The Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum Right for You?

Are you trying to decide if you would like to take the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum course at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy? Registration opens on Saturday, so I thought I would share some reviews from those who have taken the course to help you decide if it is for you.

This hands-on course is an opportunity for advanced genealogists to put their research skills into practice. Participants work on five complex genealogical research problems—a new one each day. Each case requires careful evidence evaluation and/or additional research to solve. The objective is to give each student experience in conducting research on complex problems, analyzing and correlating evidence, and reaching conclusions.
 
The cases are all brand new for 2017 and will feature new methodologies, geographic areas and ethnicities not covered before in the course. For details on the course click here and scroll to the bottom of the course list. 

To give perspective on the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum course here are some reviews from past participants: 


The toughest genealogy course you can take? by Harold Henderson, CG

More on the Toughest Genealogy Course by Harold Henderson, CG

A Challenging and Inspiring Learning Experience by Barbara Ball, CG

Measuring Your Success at Solving Genealogical Problems by Melinda Henningfield, CG

An Insider's View of the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum by Harold Henderson, CG

Waking Up Your Brain with the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum course at SLIG 
by Corey Browder Oiesen


This course is designed for advanced genealogists who have sufficient experience and education to work on complex genealogical problems. 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Genealogy Professor: New Online Courses

As I walked the vendor hall at the NGS conference I discovered a brand new opportunity in genealogy education. Today Michael Leclerc is launching a new venture to put genealogy courses online. He has shared with me his press release announcing Genealogy Professor.

May 4, 2016 – Boston, MA. Founder Michael J. Leclerc, CG is excited to announce the launch of a new opportunity for genealogy education. Genealogy Professor developed from a passion to provide high-quality independent education to those who want to find their ancestors. Major websites often focus on getting subscribers in the door without considering that most genealogists need a variety of resources to identify the members of their family tree. Our focus is high-quality education to give researchers the tools they need, no matter where those tools are to be found. This includes the incredible resources that are not yet available online that can make the difference between success and failure.



Self-Paced Courses are self-contained, so that you can take them anytime, anywhere you like. Video presentations allow you to see the professor and the slides at the same time, letting you to switch your attention back and forth between them. There are also reading assignments and other tasks to complete. Quizzes help reinforce your learning, and give you feedback to help you keep on track, letting you get right to work in your research.


Genealogy Masterclasses take online genealogy learning to a different level, with live online classes where the students interact with each other and the professor. Homework assignments may be more complex than Self-Paced courses. And some include one-on-one online sessions with the professor, allowing the students to discuss questions and subjects. These conversations are recorded, with a copy provided to the student to keep for future reference.


"There are a variety of genealogical educational opportunities out there," Leclerc says. "We offer a different approach, to help bridge the gap from simple webinars to the complex university courses and genealogy institutes."


We believe in giving back to the genealogical community. Individually, we have all spent countless hours volunteering for genealogical societies and organizations, as speakers, writers, editors, board members, consultants, and more. A percentage of the proceeds from our courses is earmarked for support of community projects for work of interest to genealogists. These projects may include records preservation and increased access to materials among others.


Contact 

Michael J. Leclerc
Michael@genprof.net
www.genprof.net

GRIP Announces 2017 Courses

I was excited to receive the following press release from the Genealogical Institute of Pittsburgh. They look like they have some excellent courses lined up for 2017.

ANNOUNCING 2017 GRIP COURSES 

Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh holds week-long courses at La Roche College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, each summer in two separate weeks, each with different courses. The 2017 dates are June 25-30, 2017 and July 16-21, 2017. The following courses will be held (schedule to be determined):
§  Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D. with “Practical Genetic Genealogy”
§  Harold Henderson, CG, and Kimberly Powell with “Confusion to Conclusion: How to Write Proof Arguments”
§  Melissa A. Johnson, CG with “Gateway to the Garden State: Sources and Strategies for New Jersey Research”
§  Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG with “Mastering the Art of Genealogical Documentation”
§  Michael J. Leclerc, CG with “Writing and Sharing Your Family History”
§  David McDonald, CG with “Research in the states of the Old Northwest Territory”
§  CeCe Moore with “Advanced Genetic Genealogy”
§  David Rencher, AG, CG with “Irish Genealogical Research”
§  Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL & Richard G. Sayre, CG, CGL with “Law School for Genealogists”
§  Richard G. Sayre, CG, CGL, Pam Boyer Sayre, CG, CGL with “Research in Washington, DC, from Afar”
§  Paula Stuart-Warren, CG with “Intermediate Genealogy: Tools for Digging Deeper”
§  Amy L. Wachs, J.D. with “Tracing Your Roots in Eastern Europe”
For the latest news, sign up for email notifications at www.GRIPitt.org or “Like” us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/GRIPitt/.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

NGS Conference Recording Packages

Are you attending the NGS Family History Conference next week? I am excited to be there in person, but I always miss some excellent sessions because I can only be in one place at a time.

Are you unable to attend the NGS conference in Florida? Would you like to hear some of the conference sessions from home? Well, here are your options.

Option 1 --
There is still time to sign up to watch the live-streaming of ten of the sessions on Thursday and Friday, May 5th and 6th. If watching live does not fit into your schedule, you will have three months to watch the sessions at your convenience. Here is the link to register.


Option 2 -- 
You can purchase a pass which will include audio recordings of ALL 140 sessions of the conference! See the three package options in below, and click here to order online from PlayBack. This is a great deal, and if you act fast you can save $100 on the package by ordering before May 7th. After that date the prices go up.  

Option 3 --
If you just have a few sessions you are interested in, you can order them individually for $10 each. Click here to see a listing of all of the sessions by topic or presenter. I have ordered individual recordings of my favorite sessions for each of the last eight years. It is a great way to hear some of the best presenters in genealogy while you drive to work or take your daily walk. 

I hope you enjoy these options for continuing your genealogy education!

Angela

Monday, April 18, 2016

Space Available in ProGen Study Group

Have you been thinking of joining a ProGen Study Group to work through the manual Professional Genealogy with other genealogists? Do you have a friend that you would recommend for the course? There is an unusual opportunity right now to skip the waiting list and join a study group starting June 1st. 

If you feel you have the time and the experience requisite for the challenge of the ProGen Study Program, please see our website for details and then submit your application to the waiting list at http://progenstudy.org/

The study groups that have current openings will meet the first week of the month for a 60 minute discussion, once a month for 18 months, at the following times:

Friday, 11:00am Pacific, Noon Mountain, 1:00pm Central, 2:00pm Eastern

Sunday, 7:00pm Pacific, 8:00pm Mountain, 9:00pm Central, 10:00pm Eastern

If these do not work for you, then you can join the waiting list and hold off for the next study group to form in October.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Swing Through the South at SLIG

This is part of my ongoing series featuring guest authors writing reviews of the courses offered at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. I am excited to to have these friends share their perspective on the institute and the education they received. 

Review of "Swing Through the South" 
By Charmaine Riley Holley

In Womenfolks:Growing Up Down South [Houghton Mifflin (Trade) (July 26,1984)] Shirley Abbott wrote: “Besides its content and methods, the cuisine devised by squaws and hillbilly women, as well as slave women, had another thing in common, which was the belief that you made do with whatever you could lay hands on--pigs' entrails, turnip tops, cowpeas, terrapins, catfish--anything that didn't bite you first.” 

In the 2016 SLIG (Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy) course, Swing Through The South, we may not have discussed historical Southern cuisine, but we discussed geography, military, research methodology, and much more. We most definitely missed course coordinator J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA, but the course co-coordinator Kelvin L. Meyers and course instructors Deborah A. Abbott, Ph.D, Ann Gillespie Mitchell, and Michael Hait, CG, took us through a whirlwind tour. 

There were several presentations on general research methodology such as “Wills, Estates and Guardians” and “Essential Federal Records (Non-Military)”. Anne Gillespie Mitchell taught us how to be super searchers in “ Where Do I Go Next? Essential Search Skills”. Michael Hait shared the concept that “Everything happened in a place.” in “Maps, Atlases, and Gazetteers”. 

Kelvin, master of all things Texas, presented several of Mark’s lectures but truly shined when sharing his knowledge of researching the Lone Star State, as well as church records (“How Great Thou Art! Essentials of Church Records”). We covered seven major time periods in Texas history from 1519-1865. Kelvin does an excellent job of using his family and client case studies to exemplify the use of specific records. I hope that at sometime in the future one of the institutes has him do an entire session on Texas. 

In “Finding Records Through the South” Michael Hait reminded us that, not only do we need records, but we need to know who created the records. Next, we need to ask where are the original records now. Thanks to Michael and ARCHIVEGRID ( https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/ ) I found a Woodford County, KY slave record at Pennsylvania State University in their Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection. 

Anne Gillespie Mitchell is an energetic presenter and covered “Uniquely Southern Military Records” and “Farming and Other Occupations” along with being our tour guide for North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. During her class on “Strategies of the South” she reminded us to start with a solid research plan and to consult with fellow researchers. We were also provided with many tips on doing online research along the way. 

Dr. Deborah Abbott presented one of the most outstanding case study based lectures I have heard. Her love of using maps, manuscripts, and special collections was evident in “Learning about Neighbours, Family and Friends Through Manuscripts & Special Collections” and “People, Places, and Connected Records” (“black records that white people should look at”- Dr. Abbott), but “Follow a Case with Land” was mesmerising. Her tenacity and use of maps was extremely enlightening and the case was fascinating as presented. 

Homework assignments were reasonable and instructive, as were the short sessions we had with Mark Lowe when technology cooperated. I left SLIG with new knowledge, a 188 page syllabus full of information (thanks Luana Wentz Darby for great hard copies!), and a truism and admonition from Mark Lowe: 

Truism : “People die where they are.” (M Lowe) 

Admonition: “We should know our ancestors so well that we recognize them without their name tags.” (M Lowe) 





Charmaine Riley Holley has been a family historian and genealogist for more than thirty years. She is 100% Colonial Southern on her maternal side and has one “Yankee” line (Massachusetts Bay Colony) on her paternal side. Fascinated with incorporating DNA, Charmaine has recently been hired to do contract genetic and non-genetic genealogy research with a major company. She has attended many institute programs and hopes to attend many more as a great believer in continuous education.